Antique Arcade

I had this idea that just wouldn't go away. I wanted to build an antique looking Pac-Man Arcade Cabinet. I thought it would be really cool to build something that looked really old but was a working arcade machine. Since the Raspberry Pi was often used for these projects I started with a Raspberry Pi Model B+ and the Retropie distribution of the OS.

  • The Antique Cabinet

    Found this non-working Zenith Radio/Record Player at the flea market last weekend for $25.

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  • The inside

    It had a metal catch on the back that only allowed it to open this far, my Dremel tool with a grinder took care of that. The lid was just about the same size as the Dell 1703FPS monitor I was mounting in it.

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  • Dell 1703FPS Monitor

    Bought this used Dell 1703FPS monitor on eBay for $30. It has a DVI port that I can plug a DVI to HDMI converter(also from ebay for about $5) into that works great with the Raspberry Pi. The monitor also has a 4 port USB hub built in that allows me to plugin in power for the Raspberry Pi, a usb speaker, a usb arcade controller and an extra cable for a keyboard if I ever need to do maintainence.

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  • Destruction

    First things first, grab some screwdrivers and pry the plastic back off the monitor. I won't be needing it. I also had to grind a metal peg off the lower back, just above the RGB port. The 4 holes in the back are what I'll use for mounting the screen in the lid of the Record Player. I also turned the side mounted USB ports to point down so that I could use them once the monitor was mounted.

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  • More destruction

    Ok next I gutted the turn table...

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  • Tubes and speaker

    I left the tubes in because they looked cool. The old speaker came out so I can mount the USB speaker in the same spot.

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  • Turn table

    Sort of sad, but not needed.

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  • Mounting the Raspberry Pi

    This is where the Raspberry Pi will go.

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  • Mounting the monitor

    To mount the monitor I cut a piece of plywood that fit tight into the lid of the record player and screwed it to the 4 holes on the back of the monitor, making it removable if needed.

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  • The Joystick/Button Panel

    The Joystick/Button Panel wired and ready to go. Button kit was also purchased on eBay for $30 from China. However I had a $25 bonus on eBay that I used! The kit came fairly quickly consider it was shipped from China.

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  • The Joystick/Button Panel

    From the top.

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  • The Finished Product

    Here it is! Unfortunately I discovered that the USB hub in the monitor is faulty and doesn't supply enough power to run the Raspberry Pi. So I will need an extra power supply to run the Raspberry Pi. Kind of disappointing since I thought it would be really cool to turn everything on and off using the single power button on the the front of the monitor.

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